Tag Archives: Jon Reiss

Theatrical screenings

While it is still the hope of every filmmaker we know that their film will be seen on the big screen, very often they do not have a clear idea of the work and money involved in making this happen. They also do not have an idea of the kind of revenue (or lack thereof) these screenings will generate. There are a few passages in the book that address this topic and the many ways filmmakers are screening their films.

This first piece is from Ben Niles, director of Note by Note. After Ben had taken the film back from his sales agent, he set about looking for a theatrical distributor.

I was trying to find an indie distributor and I was getting pretty frustrated because these people that I was told were indie distributors still wanted me to spend $50,000 to$75,000. They wanted me to get a 35mm print; they wanted a ton of money for P and A, and I said, ‘I guess I’m missing it, because that’s not indie to me.’

Ben met with Jim Brown from Argot Pictures and they agreed on a monthly fee for Jim to book the film theatrically. The successful Film Forum screening was crucial, because theaters across the US look to NY box office figures to see what might be good to book locally.

Jim and I worked out a guaranteed three-month deal to see if he could get any traction for the film, and then we would step back and renegotiate if everybody was happy. Well, we renegotiated like within six weeks. The phone wasringing off the hook.

Within the first year, they had 50 theatrical and 20 alternative theatrical dates grossing $100,000.

Since the New York theatrical was done at Film Forum, who provided the publicist, Ben was able to keep the costs of the theatrical release very low. He spent a total of $4,500 on publicists in LA, SF and Chicago, which Ben thought was very effective and a wise spend. He also spent $3,000 on print ads, (which Ben considered a waste of money [but is often required by the theaters]), and $500 on dubs.

Case study The Best and the Brightest had an interesting theatrical release partly through Emerging Pictures.  Jon Reiss explains Emerging’s model

Emerging Pictures has a relationshipwith about 100 theaters nationwide, in which they can deliver a digital “print/file” for no cost. In other words, they have eliminated all print costs (even BluRay) and created a network of theaters that are connected to audiences. In addition, if you have a live event after your screening, Emerging can net-cast this to any of their member theaters. All this costs is $1000 encoding fee and 70% of the box office; the filmmaker keeps the other 30%.

Here is more about Best’s theatrical screenings:

“New Video [the film’s DVD distributor] and Weiser [the film’s producer] engaged Marian Koltai-Levine of PMK to create a theatrical release for the film in New York and Los Angeles (Miami also came on board as part of Baldwin’s sneak previews) for a fee of $50,000. New Video put up 50% of this fee,which included around $20,000 for print ads. The 50K also included the four-wall fees for the theaters in NY and Los Angeles. It made sense for Best to spend this money because they had stars in the film. Hence, they would get reviews as well as other forms of national press, such as Neil Patrick Harris on Conan O’Brien, Amy Sedaris on Letterman and John Hodgman on The Daily Show, among others. Total gross for opening weekend—$4,771—hence the per screen average for NY/LA: $2,385.50. Weiser told us, ‘There was no expectation of making our money back from the theatrical itself, but we hope it will all impact the bottom line DVD/VOD/digital sales.’ Koltai-Levine was also able to get Emerging Pictures on board to continue the theatrical into about 30 to 40 additional cities.”

The chapter on Adventures of Power demonstrates the work, expense and risk of theatrical screenings.

“Ari hired Dylan Marchetti’s company Variance Films to do the theatrical release and he worked with Range Life on the event/semi-theatrical.

Did you do traditional theatrical, and if so, how much time did you spend to set it up?

Ari: I spent about four months setting it up.

How much did you spend on the theatrical?

Ari: $150,000. [he thinks that $20,000 went to prints.]

How long was the theatrical run?

Ari: About six weeks.

How many cities were full-week runs?

Ari: Eight.

In how many cities did you have alternative theatrical screenings?

Ari: 15.

According to Box Office Mojo, the film grossed just $17, 419. Ari still feels like it helped by generating publicity and awareness for the film for the ancillaries.

How much did you spend to book your alternative theatrical release?

Ari: $1,500.

How much did you gross on your alternative theatrical release?

Ari: $800.

To read more in depth about how each case booked their screenings, worked to promote them and how they felt about the service providers they hired to work with, read Selling Your Film Without Selling Your Soul.

Our Los Angeles book launch party is tomorrow night at the Young Library at UCLA. If you plan to attend, please RSVP. There will be printed books for sale autographed by the authors as well as food and drink.

As always, you can  follow us on Facebook where we post regularly and read our posts on Twitter under the hashtag #syfnotsys.

 

 

Seven Release Strategies That Can Make or Break Your Movie

This piece originally ran on the indieWire site on September 6, 2011 just prior to the book’s release. Co author Jon Reiss takes a look at release strategies that need to be considered for independent films starting with the goals of the release. Many filmmakers (and distributors) only consider the money aspect, but there may be a variety of goals involved in making and distributing a film which will affect release patterns. Here’s Jon:

photo courtesy of Miles Maker. Co author Jon Reiss autographs the book

There are many elements in formulating a strategy to release your film. The most important consideration on the list? Knowing what you want to accomplish. Films can have a variety of goals and they aren’t all tied to making money.

1. Create a Unique Marketing and Distribution Strategy for Your Specific Film

Each film is unique and requires its own individual distribution and marketing strategy.  Each film in the book is different; most have very different audiences. Similarly, each filmmaker has a different set of goals, needs, and resources. While the studio one-size-fits-all model worked well for some independent films over the last 20 years, it was a disaster for others. With the new hybrid model of distribution, you can craft a distribution and marketing strategy that makes the most sense for your film.

You have a unique vision; use that vision to engage your audience in a unique manner. This will help separate you from the media noise that surrounds us every day.

One of the first films included in the book, “Bass Ackwards,” implemented a unique distribution strategy launched the day after their Sundance premiere concluded. To date, they are if not the only, one of the few to have tried this method.

“This really was an industry play as opposed to anything that got noticed by a more mainstream audience,” said producer Thomas Woodrow. “The intention was to create publicity buzz through the unconventional nature of the release and to have that alone drive audience interest in the film. It was definitely successful on that level. We did far, far better revenue-wise and exposure-wise than if we had tried to go a more conventional sales route.”

2. Know Your Goals

I cannot stress this enough. I cannot repeat this enough. There are multiple goals that you can strive for in the release of your film, but you must prioritize what is most important to you. I categorize the goals for the distribution and marketing of your film into the following five:

1.  Money
2.  Career launch—i.e., help for your next project.
3.  Audience/eyeballs to see the film
4.  Change the world
5.  A long-term, sustainable connection with a fanbase.

Choices you make in service of one goal will often sacrifice another goal. For instance, releasing your film for free on the internet might get you the most eyeballs, but it won’t always help you monetize the film.

You must make sure that everyone on your team is on the same page and doesn’t have conflicting goals. An example from the book, savvy and talented filmmaker Hunter Weeks from “Ride the Divide” had the goal of career launch to help his next project, but his producer Mike Dion’s goal was to make money to repay the investors. These goals are two that are traditionally in direct conflict because career launch is normally associated with some form of traditional theatrical, which in turn is usually a money drain and will not result in repaying investors.

They chose to go for the money. As a result of this focus, they have paid back their investors and garnered a lot of attention in the process, both of which will help Hunter launch his next project.

3. Set Marketing Strategy

Two helpful ways to think about marketing:
1) reaching the audience that already exists for your film
2) thinking creatively of what audiences might be interested in your film.

I recommend that you consider and conceive of a marketing strategy for your film early in the production process, even at inception. Who is its audience? How are you best going to reach them?  Are there particular blogs, organizations, print media that they subscribe to? Who will you bring on to help you outreach to your audience? How does this audience consume media?   Answering these questions will help to fashion your release strategy.

Case study film “Note by Note-The Making of  Steinway L1037” identified their core audience as Steinway owners and pianists who played Steinway pianos, then moved on to all pianists, music teachers and musicians. Another audience group they discovered through screening the film at festivals comprised people who worked with wood such as boat builders and carpenters.

“When we screened in Vermont I had all these people come up to me and say, ‘You know, I have a business; I make furniture and I loved watching these guys build this piano,’ said director Ben Niles. “It really gets down into doing things by hand, so I think anybody who likes to grow organic tomatoes or cook in the kitchen, or anybody who’s really doing something tangible can really identify with the film.”

4. Budget for Distribution and Marketing

In order to successfully execute a marketing plan for your film, a budget must be developed in tandem with your production budget. This is not an optional expense to be decided at the end of post. A marketing and distribution budget is a tool that balances what needs to be spent against what can be afforded, and helps make choices about which methods will be priorities and which ones cannot be implemented due to cost.

A well-analyzed, affordable budget will help to focus achievable marketing efforts without wasting time and money. Doing this also will show that you have a sense of how you are going to make your investors money back (and that you care).

Case study “The Best and the Brightest” went into distribution thinking that they would receive distribution offers. When those did not materialize in a way that would make sense to sell the rights to the film, producer Patricia Weiser had to find a way to raise more money for a hybrid distribution approach. “Don’t forget to have a plan (and a back-up plan) and budget for marketing/distribution in case Fox Searchlight doesn’t write you a big, fat check,” she said. “I had a plan (to use tax credit dollars for the marketing/distribution plan) that didn’t work out (investors wanted the money back). I think we’ve put together a pretty good back-up plan. We will see. The most successful people are those who are good at Plan B.”

5. Identifying and Engaging Your Audience

My  three-step approach to audience development and engagement:

1.  Know WHO your audience is.  This is not 18-25 year old boys/men. Or 35 – 55 year old women. As an independent filmmaker, if you cross over into a mass audience, great – but you need to be much more specific.
2.  Know WHERE your audience derives information/congregates. In other words, how you can contact them, engage them, communicate with them. It may not be by using online tools, but you have to know where.
3.  Know HOW your audience engages media, or HOW they will support you.

For case study “Pioneer One,” the filmmakers already had experience connecting with torrent fans through their previous film “The Lionshare,” a low-budget, narrative film about the world of file sharing. When it came time to start crowdfunding for the web series, they did outreach to every file sharing forum and publication they could to attract interest and gather donations. Not only did they surpass their initial goal of $6,000 to make a pilot, but they ended up raising all of their production budget (over $70,000 total) to finish the series through fan donations. The series is available where their fans are most likely to see it, via BitTorrent and YouTube.

6. Differentiating Core and Niche Audiences

The terms core and niche are often used interchangeably; this is a mistake.

The niche audience for your film is that slice of the population that has a particular interest in your film or an aspect of your film; the core audience for your film is those people within each niche that are your most ardent supporters. Those people will spread the word about your film not only to their networks, but to the rest of that niche. You can have multiple niches interested in your film, and within each niche there is a core who, combined, adds up to the whole core of your film.

While many of our case studies, especially the documentaries, had niche audiences, the key to their successes lies in getting through to the core audience first. With “Ride the Divide,” it was cyclists living along the race route of The Great Divide and they chose musicians also based in those areas to include in the film’s soundtrack, further bringing in the core fan base. With “American: The Bill Hicks Story,” it was reaching the fans of Hicks in the US and the UK including other comedians who were friends and colleagues of Hicks, not targeting all fans of standup comedy.

7. Engage Organizations to Promote Your Film

Know exactly where your audience derives information and congregates.

Many niches have organizations that support those specific topics and interests. Engage those organizations early in your filmmaking process (as early as conception and prep). It is important to have the proper attitude toward your audience and these organizations. Think, “What can I give them?” instead of, “What can they do for me?” If you think of the former, the latter will flow. People are very busy. You need to give them an incentive to be involved with you. That fact that you are making a film is not enough. How will the film service their organization, their lives and the lives of their members? In turn, they will help you promote your film to their direct audience.

This has been used by great effect by documentary filmmakers.  Narrative filmmakers need to follow their lead. Case study doc “For the Bible Tells Me So” was able to reach their target audience through organizational partnerships with churches AND gay rights organizations, even though their initial thought was these two groups would be at opposition to each other.

“Most of the time, maybe 70% of the time, it was small gay groups alerting other small gay groups about the film, and those groups contacting First Run [the film’s distributor] and finding venues in which to show the film to the wider (non-gay) community at large,” said director Daniel Karslake. “And then word would catch on, and people would want to be a part of the discussion. Just about everywhere, audience turn-outs were tremendous, and sellouts were common.”

When the 2008 National Convention of the United Methodist Church met to change their book of common prayer to stop condemning gay people, they ordered one DVD for each of their 900 voting members. A similar order was placed on behalf of 900 Bishops in advance of the 2008 Worldwide Anglican Communion.

This is the final week to get your free download of Selling Your Film Without Selling Your Soul. After October 1, digital copies will be $4.99 and the print copy will stay at $9.99 on our site. There will be a forever free pdf copy that does not contain pictures, links or video on our site. By November, the print copy edition will be hitting many bookstores so if you do not want to order online, you should find it in stores. The SRP is estimated at $19.99 though.

 

 

Launch Day!

books in every platform

The day has come at last and probably most of you can relate. Our baby is finally out for the world to see and we hope you all find her beautiful.

You can access the store here where all of the digital edition downloads can be found. But a few explanations…

-Our experience in dealing with the Amazon Kindle platform as a self publisher was a little frustrating. We can’t set the price at free due to a download charge they impose, so…we have a free .mobi edition on our site that you can manually upload very easily to your Kindle. It keeps the integrity of the Kindle edition with the photos and the links intact. We will have this on the site until October 1, after which time the edition will be $4.99 on the Amazon site and you can use the Whispernet system to download it in one click.

-Even though we sent the files to iBooks about 2 weeks ago, they still haven’t made it out of the processing system so the video versions are not available today unless we discover they somehow made it out. Keep checking back on this as it could be any minute. You can get the ePUB without video for your Apple device from the site.

-The free pdf will be forever free, but does not contain photos, charts or any URLs. Since the other, more enhanced versions are free for September, you may want to download those first.

We would like to express sincere gratitude to our developer David Averbach who put up will all of our incarnations of the book, our requests, our demands and a boatload of emails. We would also like to thank Jon Reiss and his assistant Alexandra Tapley for spending so much time uploading the Topspin store for our site.

We would love to thank all of our sponsors who have made this book a reality and given us the ability to publish on our own and keep control over the work. Prescreen and Area23a for the print edition, Prescreen, Dynamo Player, Gravitas Ventures, Topspin Media, Snagfilms, EggUp, as well as all of our media sponsors and in kind sponsors for the digital edition.

A huge thanks to all of the courageous and pioneering creators who participated in this book. You inspire us every day with your generosity and leadership in the cause of empowering artists to take charge of their work, their livelihoods and show them how it can be done.

I saw a great quote today that I want to share with you as it is especially fitting for the ideals behind this book. “When the heart is willing, you’ll find a thousand ways, and when it’s unwilling, you’ll find a thousand excuses.” This book is for those with willing hearts to help them find their way.

Happy Reading!

~Orly, Jeffrey, Jon and Sheri

 

Bright Spot: Bots High

Florida filmmaker Joey Daoud writes a blog called Coffee and Celluloid and I was in touch with him just before SXSW 2011 where he was doing some guerrilla screenings of his film Bots High, a documentary following the adventures of high school students who build combat robots. He shared the path to distribution of his film on the blog a few days ago and I asked if I could repost it here for all who may have missed it. Joey is one of many entrepreneurial filmmakers who are now taking responsibility for their work and connecting it to the people most likely to enjoy it. His efforts merit some championing so he’s our Bright Spot for today.

 

Great film!
– Handwritten note on a festival rejection letter

The above note sums up the festival experience of my feature film Bots High quite well. A film that people who see, love, yet didn’t get much traction on the festival circuit. It played at some festivals, won some Best Documentary awards, got some good reviews, and I had some great experiences and am thankful for the festivals that took a chance on the film. But obviously not the Sundance, SXSW, TIFF festival run you imagine while making the film 1.

Below, I’ll be outlining how I’m taking my film’s future solely in my own hands, and the ideas that led to this strategy.

What Can You Do That I Can’t?

Epic festival run or not, the next question is, “Now what?” This is a question most of us filmmakers face once we have a finished film. Even the top indie films with recognizable actors are having a hard time getting distribution deals with upfront money. Three Sundance films just posted Kickstarter campaigns to raise distribution money. Dying to Do Letterman has run a phenomenal campaign to raise money to do their own Oscar qualifying theatrical run.

Do you try to raise more money and do everything yourself? Do you tour the film around and hope to break even, like Total Badass? Hope a company comes along to pick it up? With so many digital outlets yet so few companies putting money into buying films, choosing the right path for your film reminds me of the stress of picking the “right” college.

I received some distribution offers, but nothing that paid anything upfront, just some backend percentage. This means I’m going to have to sign away broad definitions of certain rights for 20 years (essentially forever as far as the film is concerned), no guarantee that any money will be put into a marketing campaign, and hope that maybe I’ll see a couple of thousand in return.

The main question I asked for every offer is, “What can you do that I can’t do myself?” Let’s take the best offer, one from a company whose name I actually recognized. They wanted all digital rights and would get the film on iTunes, Netflix Instant, Amazon, Xbox, etc, and keep 25%. Not a terrible deal, but not many guarantees on marketing, prominent placement, etc. I can handle the online stuff through Distribber – pay a flat fee, keep everything, both money and rights. With a lot of new online-only companies out there, I feel like they’re all just trying to build their library instead of putting their time and money behind something because they believe in it.

Good deal for someone whose film has been sitting on a shelf, not for someone that just wrapped and still has some fight in them.

Check Out the Film…Possibly at a Festival Near You…Or Online…Soon

Packed theater at the Bots High World Premiere

 

Bear with me as I take you through three realizations I had that will soon merge into the mega-idea.

The bigger question wasn’t how to get it online, it was how do I launch. How do I build enough buzz so the online launch is relevant? How do I get the film on people’s radar? Previously, if I told someone about the film, or pitched a blog to write about it, it’s like, “Maybe the film will play at a festival near you…or sign up for the newsletter and I’ll let you know when it’s on iTunes.” There was no target date, no time to build towards, that people writing about the film could say, “Here is a cool film, you can watch it on this day.”

Around the same time of this brainstorming, when I was crashing SXSW with an underground screening, I found it was incredibly easy to set up a free screening (shocker!). I held a screening at the University of Texas. They donated a theater, I didn’t charge admission (but sold some DVDs), super easy – no worries about rental costs and breaking even.

Get Your Priorities Straight

If 2 you read Jon Reiss‘ great book Think Outside the Box Office, one of his key points when making your distribution plan is to figure out your goals. Do you want to make money, promote a cause, or use the film to market yourself? Going into this, as I’m sure most filmmakers do, I’m thinking, “All of the above! It’s going to make money, and because it’s making money that means it has enough buzz that I’m being promoted as a filmmaker.” Clearly, not the case. But one of the main reasons I made this movie instead of trying to work up the Hollywood ladder was to have a feature film to my name to lead to more, paid work.

So with a reworking of priorities, #1 now being to use the film to market myself as a filmmaker, that means getting the film out as wide and far as possible. Combine that with my previous two realizations, and the strategy is quite clear…

A Free Worldwide Screening Day

Yep, one day to direct everyone towards that launches the film. “Hey, Mr. Reporter, check out my film. Your readers can see it October 6, for free!” Using free tools, such as Meetup Everywhere, groups can organize based on their location and create their own screening. I want to empower people to create their own theatrical experience, which as Jon Reiss redescribes as “people watching ‘films’ with other people. Any place.” ‘Theatrical’ is not a 35mm print screening in a movie theater anymore. 3

Even if people don’t come out to a screening, here are my goals from the plan when someone mentions Bots High to someone else.

  • “Oh, I’ve heard of that film.”
  • “I saw that.”
  • “I love Bots High, I own it!”

The more blogs that write about it, the more someone is aware of it, the more that will help when I need credibility for other projects.

Free Doesn’t Mean No Money

Let’s be clear, ‘Make Money’ is not off the list (to the comfort of the patient people I owe money to). From my screening experience at festivals and ones I organized, about 2-5% of the audience buys the DVD. My thinking is cast a really wide net and if 1%-3% buy, that’s still a decent amount of money.

But I can’t have a Bots High representative at every screening selling DVDs and counting money. So in the way that I’m empowering people to organize a screening, I figured I could empower them to be retailers as well.

I sell the DVD for $20 on the web site and at screenings. But I’d be totally happy selling a guaranteed 10 DVDs for $10 each, which is what I’m doing with the event organizers. They can buy a 10 pack for $100, and then sell them at their screening for $20 each and keep the profit. I’m happy, they’re happy, win-win!

I foresee a lot of groups hosting screenings being connected to robotics programs or robotics teams themselves. I would love for the film to be used to recruit new members, whether the team does combat robotics or task oriented. I feel like teams could also use this as a fundraiser. So I also setup a ridiculously low $100 fundraising license which lets any non-profit charge admission to the screening as a fundraiser. 10 tickets at $10 and they cover the fee, then everything else goes to their program.

Make it an Event

Q&A at Bots High World Premiere 

 

I am all about Ted Hope’s and Jon Reiss‘ talk of making screenings an event. I want the film to be used as a platform for teams and schools to create an event around. Show off their robots, have mini battles (Google loves sumo-bots), get guest speakers – anything to go beyond just a movie screening and make it a unique night. Also, there needs to be something special about playing the movie on October 6 other than me saying you have to.

The one thing that’s great about festival or independent screenings is the Q&A. I didn’t want to lose that element, and with all the free streaming services out there it doesn’t have to be lost. I’ll be setting up a live webcast of myself and people from the film to answer questions that are tweeted to @botshigh. I figure most of the screenings will be in some sort of college auditorium that’s hooked up to a computer, so switching over to a webcast shouldn’t be a problem.

How You Can Help

And that’s the plan – a free, worldwide launch of my film. So far the press has been good (WIREDLaughing SquidIndieWire) and I’ve got screenings set up in IndiaSpainSouth KoreaBolivia, and 26 other cities. My goal is 100. With schools getting back in session, and constant emailing, I anticipate the numbers to pick up speed pretty quickly.

Of course you, independent film lover / maker who’s reading this, can play an important role and help set up a screening. Go here for all the details.

You can follow me on Twitter at @C47 or the film at @botshigh. I’m toying with an idea of running trailers for other independent films in similar positions before the screener disks of the movie, so if you’re a filmmaker with a movie and might be interested in this, email me.

I’ll be posting more about my experiences with this, including Distribber and getting the DVD on Amazon. Stay tuned!

 

  1. I don’t have a definitive answer for why this is, especially since festivals don’t really give feedback, just some theories from an attempted objective viewpoint, such as the film is light hearted, has a narrow focus, and doesn’t tackle a heavy issue. All the rejection letters cite record high submissions, thanks to the digital revolution which now creates a higher level of noise. I’d like to imagine my film was buried in a Raiders of the Lost Ark style pile and never watched. But who knows. Obviously this experience has left me a little bitter about festivals, which led to question their relevance at all. Especially after my short Space Miami got over 50,000 views and more online press than any festival could give a short. That’s another post, though check out this Fest vs. Online comparison. The thorough Filmmaker Magazine article on Blast! is a good example of what my film went through. 
  2. ‘If’ shouldn’t be there; if you make movies and want them to have a life after creation you must have read Think Outside the Box Office
  3. I’ll be writing in more detail about the online tools I’m using to organize this. 

Read more: http://coffeeandcelluloid.com/the-free-film-distribution-experiment/#ixzz1VLBAfaza

The Best and The Brightest Found Their Audience Despite Early Distributor Rejection

Co author Jon Reiss spoke with the team behind the film The Best and The Brightest to find out how they came to be using a hybrid approach to distributing their film. The full case study is included in the book, but the following was written by co writer/director Josh Shelov to give a little more insight into their strategy and the importance of having an actor with an engaged fan base. The actress, in this case, is not a household name, but her fans are extremely passionate and it is that passion the filmmaker have harnessed to bring the film to market. Here’s Josh.

Spurned by traditional studio distribution, “The Best and the Brightest,” a new feature-film comedy starring Neil Patrick Harris, has crafted a 21st-century model, marketing its internal assets digitally, building a bridge between passionate Facebook fans and movie theaters and rolling out a worldwide theatrical release.

Bridget Regan may not be a household name.

But if you DO know her name, there’s a decent chance you’re obsessed with it.

Ms. Regan played the lead on a syndicated television series called LEGEND OF THE SEEKER, a THE LORD OF THE RINGS-esque horses-and-wizards saga based on a popular series of books by Terry Goodkind. Ms. Regan played the lead – the all-powerful Mother Confessor, Kahlan Amnell.

The series was cancelled after two seasons. Everyone who worked on the show went back to their lives, including Ms. Regan.

Except the most vivid fans of the show. They refused to let their Seeker go.

Seeker fans are an emotional lot. Most are teenage girls: goth-y, social-media-dwelling, given to violent arcs of creativity. Given the absence of new Seeker dramas on TV, the Seekerites simply exorcised the Seeker drama within. They built fan pages, edited pirated episodes into homemade trailers, and wrote entire novels-ful of fan fiction.

Most importantly of all, they clung to each other. Bonding and rallying on Facebook and Twitter, the Seekerites looked at the world outside their favorite fantasy, and simply chose to remain within.

Meanwhile, Ms. Regan went on with her life as an actress, landing a small but juicy part in our indie comedy which, like many indies, had trouble landing a traditional distribution deal.  Instead of giving up and putting the film on the shelf,  we turned to the internet.

Whereupon we found the buzzing horde of riotously passionate Seekerites. They wanted their Bridget back. And they would move mountains to do so – no matter what vehicle Ms. Regan happened to be in. Thus began a dialogue, and a path out of the wilderness for both our filmmaking team and the fans.

Once we started directly engaging with our fans on Facebook and Twitter, we realized that many of our most active fans weren’t necessarily the fans of our bigger names – they were fans of Bridget. And they were absolutely insane with passion. These are the fans who have reached out to us directly, rallied their communities, and quite literally dragged the film on their backs into their local movie theaters.

Kate Mulgrew’s fans have done the same thing. There’s a worldwide group of hugely passionate, social-media-loving female sci-fi fans [remember Mulgrew played Captain Kathryn Janeway in Star Trek: Voyager] . The Neil Patrick Harris fans may be our greatest in number. But the Bridget Regan fans, Kate Mulgrew fans, John Hodgman fans, and Peter Serafinowcz fans have been the greatest in actual activity, promoting the film to their networks, creating fan posters and fan art, and actually taking to the streets to ask their local theatres to book the film.

One Bridget Regan fan in Houston, a 19-year-old girl named Bethany, literally stood in her local Best Buy gathering email addresses from strangers to make sure that the film would come to Houston. Thanks entirely to her audience-building efforts, we were able to afford to bring the film to Houston theatrically.

The new model for indie distribution is realizing that every film has its Bethanys. And the key is not to think of them as just fans. They’re local distribution and marketing coordinators. Treating them as fellow filmmakers benefits everyone – it benefits indie filmmakers who desperately need marketing help, and it benefits passionate fans who want to be a part of the film business.

A Seekerite named Sandi is bringing the film to Denver. Seekerite James is doing the same in St. Louis. Another Seekerite in Philadelphia – in spite of having full-blown cerebral palsy, has organized not one but three sneak previews, and has convinced one of the theaters to actually book the film for a full-on run. He edited our EPK’s for our DVD extras. Superfans want to cross the line and become filmmakers. All you have to do is engage with them.

Inspired yet? You can find more great information and real experiences in the book Selling Your Film Without Selling Your Soul Presented by Prescreen releasing in September 2011. Also like us on Facebook and follow our Twitter stream #syfnotsys.

What’s this book all about? and why digital?

Thanks for stopping by to find out more about our book, Selling Your Film Without Selling Your Soul. Yes, we are calling it a book even though it will be published only in digital form to start with. If we find that there is an overwhelming desire for filmmakers to hold a physical copy, lovingly plucked from the shelves of their local bookstore and personally signed by our intrepid authors, we will do what we can to make this possible. In the meantime, you’ll be able to try before you buy and read it online for free or purchase a premium version from iBooks or Kindle (or whatever other formats we think will be popular) and download it into the portable device of your choice.

What’s this book all about?

It is a book of case studies that takes a look at the ways filmmakers are now approaching distribution. None of the cases have used the purely traditional route of make a film, sell all rights to a distributor and hope they do a good job and earn overages beyond the advance. All have either split rights or gone totally DIY and my chapter looks at creators who are using file sharing sites to give their work away while still meeting their goals of either making a name for themselves or getting the widest audience possible for the least cost and/or making money either from crowdfunding or as revenue.

Confirmed cases are PioneerOne (a webseries), The Cosmonaut (a feature film/transmedia project), Sita Sings the Blues (feature animation), Ride the Divide (feature documentary), Note by Note (feature documentary), Bass Ackwards (feature narrative), Adventures of Power (feature narrative), Undertow (feature narrative and LGBT themed), For the Bible Tells Me So (feature documentary, LGBT themed). The cases will present an accurate picture on revenues and where they came from, marketing and distribution spend, and production budgets because we want this to be an unprecedented work; the true picture of what it takes to succeed and what success really looks like not the secrecy and  myth that largely surrounds the film industry.

Knowledge you will find in the book:
-Sales numbers in applicable windows and territories
-Budgets both production and P&A
-Outreach and partnerships with organizations and influencers, how it was accomplished
-Sales numbers on other revenue streams like merchandising, speaking gigs
-What tools and services were used to achieve results
-advice on crowdfunding and building communities around your work
Following along in these courageous filmmakers’ footsteps, this book will be self distributed because we know our audience, we know where they congregate and what they read and how to reach them. It doesn’t really make sense to turn the work of marketing and distributing (and our rights!) this book over to a publisher. We are paying for the development costs of the book and the freely distributed copies through sponsorship. Our Presenting Sponsor is PreScreen with contracts out to 2 other Official Sponsors. If you have a company that wants to reach the independent filmmaker community, please have a look at our sponsorship deck. We anticipate a lot of excitement for this book and our sponsors will surely get their brand in front of a very targeted audience. We will launch the book at one of the most premiere events in the independent film calendar, IFP Week in the brand new Film Society of Lincoln Center facility in New York City in September, but promotion of the book will continue throughout 2011/2012 at various other high profile events.

Why digital?

This book was conceived from the start in digital format because 1)The future is digital and to make this a physical text book didn’t make sense considering the themes being discussed in it, namely the future of film distribution. 2)We wanted to include a richer experience than text books could provide. There will be video interviews with the filmmakers, video samples of their work, URL links to articles used as source material or additional info the reader can use to do further research, some social media capabilities and charts/graphs/photos. 3) Orly and I were adamant that at least one copy (text only) would be given out for free online to anyone in the world who wanted this knowledge. With restrictions on physical distribution of a paper based book, that wouldn’t be possible or feasible. By using the efficient distribution abilities of the internet, we won’t be hampered by distribution logistics and costs to get the book anywhere in the world.

During the summer, we will be releasing excerpts from the book, some content that had to be cut for length or because the participant got off topic during interviews, highlights of our lovely sponsors and extra film stories that couldn’t be featured in the book, but offer valuable advice. Stay tuned because we are just getting started. We also have a hashtag on Twitter #syfnotsys (Selling Your Film Not Selling Your Soul, we have to conserve characters!) and a Facebook page, so come join us there.

You can also follow all of the authors on Twitter @shericandler @filmcollab @jon_reiss because we post some good stuff!

Take care

-Sheri